We learn in 2017 that only 18% of septuagenarian women and 12% of septuagenarian men consider themselves to be good-looking. (www.rinklifunstaz.com)

Now read on….

In the UK in the Summer of 2017, a new narrative was added to the ever-swelling pile of this-is-how-you-prevent-or-delay-the-onset-of-dementia stories which, for perfectly understandable reasons, populate the British media virtually every day. We paraphrase the headlines thus : “It’s official : an active sex life improves brain function in the Third Age”. For a recent academic study had apparently researched this truth into life. You can imagine and indeed you probably noticed what the tabloid end of the market did with this revelation.

All this was, in fact, drawn from the Wright/Jenks/Demeyere report which had been published in The Journals of Gerontology. Although the study actually concluded, perhaps rather self-damningly, that “we cannot infer a causal relationship between sexual activity and cognitive function”, this did not stop the journos who like a bit of sauce putting, as it were, one and one together. The study was indeed ready to imply, however, that human intimacy as a form of engagement with life was probably a good thing for one’s faculties all round.

We go further into the groove.

Students of NHS Digital’s regular Prescriptions Dispensed in the Community circular will have noticed that there seems to be no information offered any more about the volume of prescriptions issued for Sildenafil/Viagra. This is presumably because Viagra is fast becoming known and available as a simple buy-it-by-yourself drug, not at all OTT but as OTC as aspirin and nasal spray. Erectile dysfunction has slipped the surly bonds of the GP’s surgery and is walking Main Street. As the Pharmaceutical Journal of May 2017 baldly put it : “Viagra may soon be re-classified as a pharmacy medicine”. The regulator MHRA has, for its part broadly decided that this is indeed to be the direction of policy travel.

Viagra came into being in 1998; by 2013, the original patent had expired and the price began seriously to detumesce. One can assume, moreover, that nearly twenty years of use and side-effects monitoring have been such that modern medicine does not regard Sildenafil (or its cousin drugs which now do the same job) as intrinsically dangerous to the average older man’s well-being.

Back home.

Meanwhile, by mid-2017, the ONS was reporting an interesting increase in household-formation churn. Basically, more over-65s are (re-)marrying and, contrary to the national trend, (re-)divorcing. For the period 2005-2015:

“…the number of men divorcing aged 65 and over went up by 23% and the number of women of the same age divorcing increased by 38%”.

In addition and eye-catchingly:

“More than half (56%) of men aged 65 and over who tied the knot in 2014 married a woman under 65; in contrast, only (sic) 22% of women aged 65 and over married a man under 65”.

Now, of course, the reasons behind these behaviours are multiple and not necessarily very romantic. Some may, for instance, want to marry again in their Third Age in pursuit of tax advantages. But it’s hard not to take the impression that love for the sexa-septua-octo generation is a fully developed consumerism now : ever more of the bald and silver-haired have high and irreducible expectations. They are healthier and wealthier and more active than ever in so many spheres  –   with the result any threadbare old intimacy-furniture lying around can expect to be taken to the dump. There will be those who deplore this phenomenon. But there you go.

Where this is headed.

In his striking autobiography (2017), Age Is Just A Number (what a 97 year old can teach us about getting older), Charles Eugster tells of how, recently widowed in his 80s, he hires a trainer to help him re-grow his physique. He has but one firm purpose; he wants his butt to be purposefully firm.

“’I want a beach body’, I told him. ‘There are beautiful seventy year old girls out there and I want to turn their heads’”.

Again, not everyone will find this sort of mindset particularly engaging or worthy of imitation. But we live in an age where a septuagenarian rock-star can have a child with his twentysomething girlfriend and barely a ripple passes over the tabloid pond. Meanwhile, in 2017 Ana Obregón, Spain’s most famous socialite, announces that she is to pose for Playboy at the age of 62. Again, not everyone’s cup of horchata, but for her efforts that is indeed some applause you hear in the distance.  Taboos are getting pricked everywhere.

Looks Good.

If our figures about low self-esteem in the personal appearance department among the septuans are not an invitation to commercial and cultural innovation then we do not know what would be. The assault on wrinkles and thinning hair and bad abs is no longer a drôle de guerre, full of hesitation and embarrassment. It’s a revolution, a revolution in blemish-removal and devil-may-care. Well on its way.

We learn in 2017 that only 18% of septuagenarian women and 12% of septuagenarian men consider themselves to be good-looking. (www.rinklifunstaz.com)

Now read on….

In the UK in the Summer of 2017, a new narrative was added to the ever-swelling pile of this-is-how-you-prevent-or-delay-the-onset-of-dementia stories which, for perfectly understandable reasons, populate the British media virtually every day. We paraphrase the headlines thus : “It’s official : an active sex life improves brain function in the Third Age”. For a recent academic study had apparently researched this truth into life. You can imagine and indeed you probably noticed what the tabloid end of the market did with this revelation.

All this was, in fact, drawn from the Wright/Jenks/Demeyere report which had been published in The Journals of Gerontology. Although the study actually concluded, perhaps rather self-damningly, that “we cannot infer a causal relationship between sexual activity and cognitive function”, this did not stop the journos who like a bit of sauce putting, as it were, one and one together. The study was indeed ready to imply, however, that human intimacy as a form of engagement with life was probably a good thing for one’s faculties all round.

We go further into the groove.

Students of NHS Digital’s regular Prescriptions Dispensed in the Community circular will have noticed that there seems to be no information offered any more about the volume of prescriptions issued for Sildenafil/Viagra. This is presumably because Viagra is fast becoming known and available as a simple buy-it-by-yourself drug, not at all OTT but as OTC as aspirin and nasal spray. Erectile dysfunction has slipped the surly bonds of the GP’s surgery and is walking Main Street. As the Pharmaceutical Journal of May 2017 baldly put it : “Viagra may soon be re-classified as a pharmacy medicine”. The regulator MHRA has, for its part broadly decided that this is indeed to be the direction of policy travel.

Viagra came into being in 1998; by 2013, the original patent had expired and the price began seriously to detumesce. One can assume, moreover, that nearly twenty years of use and side-effects monitoring have been such that modern medicine does not regard Sildenafil (or its cousin drugs which now do the same job) as intrinsically dangerous to the average older man’s well-being.

Back home.

Meanwhile, by mid-2017, the ONS was reporting an interesting increase in household-formation churn. Basically, more over-65s are (re-)marrying and, contrary to the national trend, (re-)divorcing. For the period 2005-2015:

“…the number of men divorcing aged 65 and over went up by 23% and the number of women of the same age divorcing increased by 38%”.

In addition and eye-catchingly:

“More than half (56%) of men aged 65 and over who tied the knot in 2014 married a woman under 65; in contrast, only (sic) 22% of women aged 65 and over married a man under 65”.

Now, of course, the reasons behind these behaviours are multiple and not necessarily very romantic. Some may, for instance, want to marry again in their Third Age in pursuit of tax advantages. But it’s hard not to take the impression that love for the sexa-septua-octo generation is a fully developed consumerism now : ever more of the bald and silver-haired have high and irreducible expectations. They are healthier and wealthier and more active than ever in so many spheres  –   with the result any threadbare old intimacy-furniture lying around can expect to be taken to the dump. There will be those who deplore this phenomenon. But there you go.

Where this is headed.

In his striking autobiography (2017), Age Is Just A Number (what a 97 year old can teach us about getting older), Charles Eugster tells of how, recently widowed in his 80s, he hires a trainer to help him re-grow his physique. He has but one firm purpose; he wants his butt to be purposefully firm.

“’I want a beach body’, I told him. ‘There are beautiful seventy year old girls out there and I want to turn their heads’”.

Again, not everyone will find this sort of mindset particularly engaging or worthy of imitation. But we live in an age where a septuagenarian rock-star can have a child with his twentysomething girlfriend and barely a ripple passes over the tabloid pond. Meanwhile, in 2017 Ana Obregón, Spain’s most famous socialite, announces that she is to pose for Playboy at the age of 62. Again, not everyone’s cup of horchata, but for her efforts that is indeed some applause you hear in the distance.  Taboos are getting pricked everywhere.

Looks Good.

If our figures about low self-esteem in the personal appearance department among the septuans are not an invitation to commercial and cultural innovation then we do not know what would be. The assault on wrinkles and thinning hair and bad abs is no longer a drôle de guerre, full of hesitation and embarrassment. It’s a revolution, a revolution in blemish-removal and devil-may-care. Well on its way.

We learn in 2017 that only 18% of septuagenarian women and 12% of septuagenarian men consider themselves to be good-looking. (www.rinklifunstaz.com)

Now read on….

In the UK in the Summer of 2017, a new narrative was added to the ever-swelling pile of this-is-how-you-prevent-or-delay-the-onset-of-dementia stories which, for perfectly understandable reasons, populate the British media virtually every day. We paraphrase the headlines thus : “It’s official : an active sex life improves brain function in the Third Age”. For a recent academic study had apparently researched this truth into life. You can imagine and indeed you probably noticed what the tabloid end of the market did with this revelation.

All this was, in fact, drawn from the Wright/Jenks/Demeyere report which had been published in The Journals of Gerontology. Although the study actually concluded, perhaps rather self-damningly, that “we cannot infer a causal relationship between sexual activity and cognitive function”, this did not stop the journos who like a bit of sauce putting, as it were, one and one together. The study was indeed ready to imply, however, that human intimacy as a form of engagement with life was probably a good thing for one’s faculties all round.

We go further into the groove.

Students of NHS Digital’s regular Prescriptions Dispensed in the Community circular will have noticed that there seems to be no information offered any more about the volume of prescriptions issued for Sildenafil/Viagra. This is presumably because Viagra is fast becoming known and available as a simple buy-it-by-yourself drug, not at all OTT but as OTC as aspirin and nasal spray. Erectile dysfunction has slipped the surly bonds of the GP’s surgery and is walking Main Street. As the Pharmaceutical Journal of May 2017 baldly put it : “Viagra may soon be re-classified as a pharmacy medicine”. The regulator MHRA has, for its part broadly decided that this is indeed to be the direction of policy travel.

Viagra came into being in 1998; by 2013, the original patent had expired and the price began seriously to detumesce. One can assume, moreover, that nearly twenty years of use and side-effects monitoring have been such that modern medicine does not regard Sildenafil (or its cousin drugs which now do the same job) as intrinsically dangerous to the average older man’s well-being.

Back home.

Meanwhile, by mid-2017, the ONS was reporting an interesting increase in household-formation churn. Basically, more over-65s are (re-)marrying and, contrary to the national trend, (re-)divorcing. For the period 2005-2015:

“…the number of men divorcing aged 65 and over went up by 23% and the number of women of the same age divorcing increased by 38%”.

In addition and eye-catchingly:

“More than half (56%) of men aged 65 and over who tied the knot in 2014 married a woman under 65; in contrast, only (sic) 22% of women aged 65 and over married a man under 65”.

Now, of course, the reasons behind these behaviours are multiple and not necessarily very romantic. Some may, for instance, want to marry again in their Third Age in pursuit of tax advantages. But it’s hard not to take the impression that love for the sexa-septua-octo generation is a fully developed consumerism now : ever more of the bald and silver-haired have high and irreducible expectations. They are healthier and wealthier and more active than ever in so many spheres  –   with the result any threadbare old intimacy-furniture lying around can expect to be taken to the dump. There will be those who deplore this phenomenon. But there you go.

Where this is headed.

In his striking autobiography (2017), Age Is Just A Number (what a 97 year old can teach us about getting older), Charles Eugster tells of how, recently widowed in his 80s, he hires a trainer to help him re-grow his physique. He has but one firm purpose; he wants his butt to be purposefully firm.

“’I want a beach body’, I told him. ‘There are beautiful seventy year old girls out there and I want to turn their heads’”.

Again, not everyone will find this sort of mindset particularly engaging or worthy of imitation. But we live in an age where a septuagenarian rock-star can have a child with his twentysomething girlfriend and barely a ripple passes over the tabloid pond. Meanwhile, in 2017 Ana Obregón, Spain’s most famous socialite, announces that she is to pose for Playboy at the age of 62. Again, not everyone’s cup of horchata, but for her efforts that is indeed some applause you hear in the distance.  Taboos are getting pricked everywhere.

Looks Good.

If our figures about low self-esteem in the personal appearance department among the septuans are not an invitation to commercial and cultural innovation then we do not know what would be. The assault on wrinkles and thinning hair and bad abs is no longer a drôle de guerre, full of hesitation and embarrassment. It’s a revolution, a revolution in blemish-removal and devil-may-care. Well on its way.We learn in 2017 that only 18% of septuagenarian women and 12% of septuagenarian men consider themselves to be good-looking. (www.rinklifunstaz.com)
Now read on….
In the UK in the Summer of 2017, a new narrative was added to the ever-swelling pile of this-is-how-you-prevent-or-delay-the-onset-of-dementia stories which, for perfectly understandable reasons, populate the British media virtually every day. We paraphrase the headlines thus : “It’s official : an active sex life improves brain function in the Third Age”. For a recent academic study had apparently researched this truth into life. You can imagine and indeed you probably noticed what the tabloid end of the market did with this revelation.
All this was, in fact, drawn from the Wright/Jenks/Demeyere report which had been published in The Journals of Gerontology. Although the study actually concluded, perhaps rather self-damningly, that “we cannot infer a causal relationship between sexual activity and cognitive function”, this did not stop the journos who like a bit of sauce putting, as it were, one and one together. The study was indeed ready to imply, however, that human intimacy as a form of engagement with life was probably a good thing for one’s faculties all round.
We go further into the groove.
Students of NHS Digital’s regular Prescriptions Dispensed in the Community circular will have noticed that there seems to be no information offered any more about the volume of prescriptions issued for Sildenafil/Viagra. This is presumably because Viagra is fast becoming known and available as a simple buy-it-by-yourself drug, not at all OTT but as OTC as aspirin and nasal spray. Erectile dysfunction has slipped the surly bonds of the GP’s surgery and is walking Main Street. As the Pharmaceutical Journal of May 2017 baldly put it : “Viagra may soon be re-classified as a pharmacy medicine”. The regulator MHRA has, for its part broadly decided that this is indeed to be the direction of policy travel.
Viagra came into being in 1998; by 2013, the original patent had expired and the price began seriously to detumesce. One can assume, moreover, that nearly twenty years of use and side-effects monitoring have been such that modern medicine does not regard Sildenafil (or its cousin drugs which now do the same job) as intrinsically dangerous to the average older man’s well-being.
Back home.
Meanwhile, by mid-2017, the ONS was reporting an interesting increase in household-formation churn. Basically, more over-65s are (re-)marrying and, contrary to the national trend, (re-)divorcing. For the period 2005-2015:
“…the number of men divorcing aged 65 and over went up by 23% and the number of women of the same age divorcing increased by 38%”.
In addition and eye-catchingly:
“More than half (56%) of men aged 65 and over who tied the knot in 2014 married a woman under 65; in contrast, only (sic) 22% of women aged 65 and over married a man under 65”.
Now, of course, the reasons behind these behaviours are multiple and not necessarily very romantic. Some may, for instance, want to marry again in their Third Age in pursuit of tax advantages. But it’s hard not to take the impression that love for the sexa-septua-octo generation is a fully developed consumerism now : ever more of the bald and silver-haired have high and irreducible expectations. They are healthier and wealthier and more active than ever in so many spheres – with the result any threadbare old intimacy-furniture lying around can expect to be taken to the dump. There will be those who deplore this phenomenon. But there you go.
Where this is headed.
In his striking autobiography (2017), Age Is Just A Number (what a 97 year old can teach us about getting older), Charles Eugster tells of how, recently widowed in his 80s, he hires a trainer to help him re-grow his physique. He has but one firm purpose; he wants his butt to be purposefully firm.
“’I want a beach body’, I told him. ‘There are beautiful seventy year old girls out there and I want to turn their heads’”.
Again, not everyone will find this sort of mindset particularly engaging or worthy of imitation. But we live in an age where a septuagenarian rock-star can have a child with his twentysomething girlfriend and barely a ripple passes over the tabloid pond. Meanwhile, in 2017 Ana Obregón, Spain’s most famous socialite, announces that she is to pose for Playboy at the age of 62. Again, not everyone’s cup of horchata, but for her efforts that is indeed some applause you hear in the distance. Taboos are getting pricked everywhere.
Looks Good.
If our figures about low self-esteem in the personal appearance department among the septuans are not an invitation to commercial and cultural innovation then we do not know what would be. The assault on wrinkles and thinning hair and bad abs is no longer a drôle de guerre, full of hesitation and embarrassment. It’s a revolution, a revolution in blemish-removal and devil-may-care. Well on its way.